Frequently asked questions

Q – If the Forth Road Bridge is closed due to high winds won’t the Queensferry Crossing also need to close?
A – As the Queensferry Crossing incorporates advanced wind-shielding technology, it can remain open during much higher wind speeds than the Forth Road Bridge. Variable message signs will display any restrictions resulting from adverse weather or an incident.

Q – Are all buses allowed to use the Forth Road Bridge and hard shoulder bus lanes?
A – Buses and coaches that carry more than 8 passengers for hire or reward can use the Forth Road Bridge – see Access restrictions. The use of hard shoulder bus lanes is legally restricted to buses and coaches that can carry 24 seated passengers or more – see Bus lane/hard shoulder operation under Intelligent Transport System (ITS).

Q – If there is an incident on the Queensferry Crossing, such as a road traffic accident, will traffic be allowed to use the Forth Road Bridge?
A – Subject to the type and likely duration of the incident, the road operating company, in conjunction with the police, can agree to activate emergency connections to divert traffic via the Forth Road Bridge – see maps of North road network and South road network.

Q – If congestion continues in the area will you consider opening up the Forth Road Bridge to general traffic?
A – The Queensferry Crossing replaces, but does not increase, the road provision for general traffic across the Firth of Forth. It is not Scottish Government policy to provide for unconstrained growth in vehicle traffic and to attempt to do so would be unsustainable. Any increase in demand will need to be met by public transport and walking/cycling.

Q – Is it safe to have any traffic on the Forth Road Bridge given the issues with the main cables and the truss end links?
A – Yes, it is safe. Monitoring of the Forth Road Bridge is ongoing and indicates that it is continuing to perform acceptably. In addition, retaining limited use of the Forth Road Bridge as a Public Transport Corridor will remove the heavy traffic loading on it, thus helping to extend its operational life.

Q – Where is the best place to stop to view the Queensferry Crossing and Forth Road Bridge?
A – The Queensferry Crossing and its approaches will be motorway (M90) and, therefore, it will not be possible to stop on the crossing or its approaches. The nearest car parks to the Queensferry Crossing are situated at the Contact & Education Centre (CEC), the Fife Council car park (which is accessed off the B981) and a layby on the A904 east of Newton. These parking places are marked on the map under the introduction to the Road user guide. There is a public walkway on the Forth Road Bridge and a viewing platform at the CEC.

Q – Previous information I have seen refers to a "managed crossing strategy", what is this?
A – This guide summarises the managed crossing strategy. The term "managed" indicates that the bridges and surrounding road network have been designed to cater for all travel modes by making the most appropriate use of existing and new infrastructure.