Squares Queensferry Crossing (1)
Queensferry Crossing >
Open
Squares Forth Road Bridge (1)
Forth Road Bridge >
Restricted
Squares Forth Bridge (1)
Forth Bridge >
Open
Squares Queensferry Crossing (1)
Queensferry Crossing
Open
Motorway

Open to general traffic, subject to normal motorway restrictions

Road User Guide
Squares Forth Road Bridge (1)
Forth Road Bridge
Restricted
Footpath Closure - WEST Footpath

The WEST Footpath/Cycleway is closed due to essential Maintenance, please use the EAST Footpath/Cycleway.

Access Restrictions
Squares Forth Bridge (1)
Forth Bridge
Open

HADECS Camera FAQs

1. What is the purpose of a HADECS camera system?

The purpose of the HADECS (Highway Agency Digital Enforcement and Compliance System) camera system is to keep traffic moving over the Forth and make journey times more reliable. It achieves this by encouraging road users to travel at speeds in line with the variable speed limit.


2. When and where on the road network has the HADECS camera system been deployed?

Since 23 May 2022 a HADECS camera system has been operational over a 22km stretch of the road network between the M90 at Halbeath and the M9 north of Newbridge. 


This camera system consists of a series of 6 spot speed cameras in place to encourage improved driver behaviour and enhanced levels of compliance with the variable speed limit.  Cameras are located at:

  • Halbeath (Southbound)
  • Inverkeithing (Southbound)
  • Queensferry (Northbound)
  • Queensferry (Southbound)
  • Kirkliston (Southbound)
  • Kirkliston (Northbound)

All camera locations can be found at: www.safetycameras.gov.scot/cameras/safety-camera-locations/east/


3. Why has a HADECS camera system been introduced?

The aim is to keep traffic moving over the Forth and provide more reliable journey times.   The HADECS camera system is in place to encourage improved driver behaviour and compliance with the variable speed limit.

Over 200,000 vehicles use sections of the route every week.  Over 30,000 vehicles are speeding on some sections of the route every week with over 4,000 vehicles speeding excessively.  At peak times this has been leading to stop start conditions, congestion and less reliable journey times, with journeys taking on average up to 5 minutes longer.

4. What are the anticipated benefits of the HADECS camera system?

The aim is to provide more reliable journey times over the Forth. By encouraging improved driver behaviour and enhanced levels of compliance with the variable speed limit it is expected the HADECS camera system will help to manage traffic, smooth flows during busy period and make journey times more reliable.  The enhanced management of congestion and incidents has the potential to bring environmental benefits.

5. What is the cost of the HADECS camera system?
Costs associated with the procurement, installation and maintenance of the HADECS camera system were contained within the overall budget for the Forth Replacement Crossing project.

Ongoing operational costs will be met by Police Scotland’s East Safety Camera Unit from funding received via the annual Scottish Safety Camera Programme.

Road user questions

1. What is a HADECS Camera system?

HADECS stands for Highway Agency Digital Enforcement and Compliance System. It is a Home Office Type Approved speed enforcement system which is established and has been widely recognised and used across the UK since 2014. The system aims to encourage compliance with mandatory variable speed limits.

2. How many cameras are there and how far apart are they?

There are 6 camera sites along the 22km stretch of road and a signing strategy is in place to inform drivers that they are entering a section of the road network where these cameras have been deployed. The cameras are located at 4km-6km intervals.

3. What happens if I am detected as speeding by the HADECS camera system?

The registered keeper of the vehicle will receive a Notice of Intended Prosecution from Police Scotland within 14 days of the offence. The minimum penalty for speeding is £100 and three penalty points.

4. What happens if another vehicle is flashed when I travel past a camera?

The HADECS camera system uses an automatic digital camera and radar system to determine the speed of vehicles. The calibrated radar measures the speed of every vehicle passing the gantry. If a speeding offence is detected then two photographs are taken and these are used to provide verification that the vehicle speed detected by the radar is consistent with the distance travelled by the vehicle between the two photographs. The system also incorporates a camera that records the speed limit displayed at the time of the offence and this is included in the offence record.

5. Why are the cameras going live after being in place for a period of time?

The HADECS camera system on the M90 is the first time this type of technology has been deployed in Scotland. Since being installed the system has undergone a robust period of testing and calibration. This has provided the confidence that now is the right time to progress the camera system to live operation.

6. How will the HADECS cameras system address driver frustration?

Driver frustration on the route is partly due to the behaviour of other drivers and partly due to unreliability of journey times. Observations indicate that similar camera systems elsewhere across the UK improve driver behaviour and people are more realistic about the speed they can drive at under such a system. Journey times are anticipated to become more reliable as the cameras are expected to help reduce stop start conditions and therefore congestion.

7. Will there be more collisions due to road users watching their speedometer?

No. This concern was raised before other significant speed camera schemes were implemented previously across Scotland. However, each of these schemes have encouraged improved levels of driver behaviour and speed limit compliance leading to a reduction in collisions.

8. What signage is being used to notify road users they are entering an section of road where speed cameras are in operation?

Drivers are notified of the speed limit by electronic signage on overhead gantries. A signing regime is in place which is consistent with that used elsewhere in the UK. This meets current best practice standards. Further information on signage on this section of the road network is available at: Intelligent Transport System (ITS) | The Forth Bridges

9. What happens if the speed limit displayed on the electronic signage on the overhead gantry changes as a vehicle approaches?

When the speed limit changes on the electronic signage on overhead gantries there is a 60 second pause in live operation of the HADECS camera system. Live operation then recommences based on the new displayed speed limit. The system incorporates a camera that records the speed limit displayed on the gantry at the time of the offence and this is included in the offence record.

10. Will this have a detrimental effect on connectivity and attractiveness for investment and tourism in the east and north of Scotland?

Journey times for those complying with the speed limit will remain the same. In addition, journey time reliability will improve as a result of anticipated reduced levels of congestion. Together, this will ensure the connection is more reliable which is more attractive for investment.

11. Will tourists understand how to drive appropriately within the system?

Driving under a variable speed limit places no additional requirements on road users outside of those set out in the Highway Code. Drivers who understand the speed limit will be able to drive appropriately in the system. It is recognised that this section of the network serves a wide ranging mix of traffic. Clear signing is in place to ensure that road users are made fully aware when they are entering and exiting the speed camera controlled zone.

12. Will speeding problems move to other roads?

Performance across the road network will continue to be monitored to assess any displacement of both traffic volume and speeds. A similar exercise was carried out following other the implementation of other safety camera schemes across Scotland and no evidence was found to support any type of displacement.

13. Is the HADECS camera system capable of detecting all vehicle types?

Yes. The HADECS camera system is configured to have flexibility in its operation and is capable of detecting and enforcing speeds for all vehicle types.

14. Does the HADECS camera system work in darkness?

Yes. The HADECS Cameras system works 24/7 in all weathers. This means the roads don’t need lighting for the cameras to be effective.

15. Could you use other speed management and enforcement measures?

HADECS camera systems are proven to be effective at encouraging enhanced levels of speed limit compliance and therefore generating a low number of speeding fines. They are, in themselves, proportionate approaches to speed management, particularly on high traffic routes such as the M90 across the Queensferry Crossing.

16. Will this measure reduce opportunities for the police to detect other traffic offences on the route, negatively impacting on road safety?

Police Scotland is fully supportive of the deployment of the HADECS camera system and recognise the opportunity it will create to allow police resources to target other dangerous behaviours.

17. Who operates the HADECS camera system?

The HADECS camera system is operated by Police Scotland’s East Safety Camera Unit.

18. Can the HADECS camera system detect vehicles changing lanes?

The camera technology is a multi-lane system capable of monitoring all vehicles regardless of lane changes.

Revenue

1. Is this a mechanism to generate additional revenue from speeding offences?

No. The HADECS camera system is expected to result in an enhanced level of speed limit compliance and therefore reduces the risk of fines for drivers.

2. How can you justify issuing more fines during a cost of living crisis?

The HADECS camera system is anticipated to help manage traffic, smooth flows at busy times and make journey times over the Forth more reliable. Delivering these benefits has the potential to unlock economic growth for Scotland.

By encouraging improved driver behaviours this is anticipated to lead to enhanced levels of speed limit compliance along the route. This lowers the potential for drivers to be issued with fines and penalty points.

Evaluation

1. How will the success of the HADECS camera system be measured?

All enforcement strategies, including the HADECS camera system, are measured by comparing three years data before the scheme was introduced to three years after it was completed. Evaluated evidence will then be used to ensure any further measures introduced are likely to positively influence driver behaviours.

Road User Guide PDF

Download a printable version of the Road User Guide

Download PDF
Background image - Roadbridge Queensferrycrossing